Strategic Enhancement of NGA's Geographic Information Science Infrastructure

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Karen K. Kemp

Professor of Geographic Information Science
Director, International Masters of Science in GIS
University of Redlands
PO Box 3080, Redlands CA, 92373-0999, USA
Phone: +1 909-335-5375, Fax: +1 909-748-6344

Email: karen_kemp@redlands.edu
Web: http://www.institute.redlands.edu/kemp/

Karen Kemp is Associate Professor of Geographic Information Science and Director of the International Masters Program in GIS at the University of Redlands since 2000. Dr. Kemp holds geography degrees from University of Calgary, Alberta (BSc 1976), University of Victoria, British Columbia (MA 1982) and University of California Santa Barbara (PhD 1992). Before moving to the US in 1988, she taught in the university transfer program at Malaspina College, Nanaimo, British Columbia (now Malaspina University College). In 1988 she joined the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCGIA) in Santa Barbara working as Coordinator of Education Programs and co-editor, with Dr. Michael Goodchild, of the NCGIA Core Curriculum in GIS (1980). After completing her PhD in 1992, she worked at the Technical University of Vienna, Austria, and with Longman GeoInformation in Cambridge, England on international GIS education projects. She returned to the NCGIA in 1994 as Assistant Director and later Associate Director. In January 1999 she moved to the University of California Berkeley to become Executive Director of the Geographic Information Science Center where she helped build the foundation for an innovative campus-wide GIScience initiative. Dr. Kemp has traveled widely to present workshops on GIS education and has published extensively on this topic. She was a member of the Board of Directors of the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) from its formation in 1994 until January 2000 and acted as senior editor of the UCGIS Education Priorities. She is an active participant on various committees considering the merits of certification for GIS professionals. Her scientific research has focused on developing methods to improve the integration of environmental models with GIS from both the pedagogic and the scientific perspectives and on formalizing the conceptual models of space acquired by scientists, and now humanities scholars, across a wide range of disciplines. Selected publications include:

- Brown, D.G., G. Elmes, K.K. Kemp, S. Macey, and D. Mark. 2003. Geographic Information Systems. In Geography in America at the Dawn of the 21st Century. G.L. Gaile and C.J. Willmott, eds., Oxford University Press, pp. 353-375.
- Gregory, I., K.K. Kemp and R. Mostern, 2003. Geographical Information and Historical Research: Current progress and future directions. Humanities and Computing 13:7-22.
- Kemp, K. K. 2003. Guest Editorial: Why GIS Professional Certification Matters to Us All. Transactions in GIS 7(2): 159-163.
- Kemp, K. K. (2001). Geography and GIS. Geographic Information Systems & Science, Instructor's Manual, Wiley and Sons, on-line.
- Maher, R. and others (2001). Report for Project 19122 - Geographic information/ Geomatics - Qualifications and Certification of personnel. Oslo, Norway, ISO/TC 211 Secretariat.
- Somers, R. and others (2000). "Defining the GIS Profession and Debating Certification and Regulation". Geo Info Systems. 10: 22-29.

 

Michael F. Goodchild

Professor, Department of Geography
University of California
3611 Ellison Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060, USA
Phone: +1 805 893 8049, Fax: +1 805 893 3146

Email: good@geog.ucsb.edu
Web: http://www.geog.ucsb.edu/people/faculty_members/goodchild_michael.htm

Michael F. Goodchild is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara; Chair of the Executive Committee, National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCGIA); Associate Director of the Alexandria Digital Library Project; and Director of NCGIA’s Center for Spatially Integrated Social Science. He received his BA degree from Cambridge University in Physics in 1965 and his PhD in Geography from McMaster University in 1969. After 19 years at the University of Western Ontario, including three years as Chair, he moved to Santa Barbara in 1988. He was Director of NCGIA from 1991 to 1997.

He was elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and Foreign Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2002. He has received honorary doctorates from Laval University (1999) and Keele University (2001). In 1990 he was given the Canadian Association of Geographers Award for Scholarly Distinction, in 1996 the Association of American Geographers award for Outstanding Scholarship, in 1999 the Canadian Cartographic Association’s Award of Distinction for Exceptional Contributions to Cartography, in 2002 the Educator of the Year Award from the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science, and in 2003 the Founder's Medal of the Royal Geographical Society. In 2001 he received a Lifetime Achievement Award from Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. He has won the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Intergraph Award and twice won the Horwood Critique Prize of the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association. He was Editor of Geographical Analysis between 1987 and 1990, and serves on the editorial boards of ten other journals and book series. In 2000 he was appointed Editor of the Methods, Models, and Geographic Information Sciences section of the Annals of the Association of American Geographers.

His major publications include Geographical Information Systems: Principles and Applications (1991); Environmental Modeling with GIS (1993); Accuracy of Spatial Databases (1989); GIS and Environmental Modeling: Progress and Research Issues (1996); Scale in Remote Sensing and GIS (1997); Interoperating Geographic Information Systems (1999); Geographical Information Systems: Principles, Techniques, Management and Applications (1999); Geographic Information Systems and Science (2001); Spatial Uncertainty in Ecology (2001); and Uncertainty in Geographical Information (2002); in addition he is author of some 300 scientific papers. He was Chair of the National Research Council’s Mapping Science Committee from 1997 to 1999; has been a member of NRC's Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications; and is currently a member of NRC's Committee on Geography. His current research interests center on geographic information science, spatial analysis, the future of the library, and uncertainty in geographic data.

 

Phaedon C. Kyriakidis

Assistant Professor
Department of Geography
University of California Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060

Email: phaedon@geog.ucsb.edu
Web: http://www.geog.ucsb.edu/people/faculty_members/kyriakidis_phaedon.htm

Phaedon C. Kyriakidis is Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of California Santa Barbara, and holds a Faculty Staff Scientist appointment in the Earth Sciences Division, Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Kyriakides was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in Geology from Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki (1994) and a Ph.D. in Geostatistics from Stanford University (1999), where he studied under Dr. Andre Journel in the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences. After completing his Ph.D., Dr. Kyriakides accepted an appointment as a Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Earth Sciences Division of Berkeley National Laboratory (1999-2000). Dr. Kyriakides has been conducting collaborative research on geostatistics since 1994 with the following focal areas: (i) stochastic simulation for modeling mineral reserves, (ii) spatially distributed accuracy assessment statistics, (iii) development of distributed parameter time series approaches for modeling levels of non-point source pollution in space and time, (iv) modeling uncertainty and accuracy of digital spatial information, (v) development of geostatistical methods for downscaling spatial data in hydrometeorological data assimilation, and geographical information science. Dr. Kyriakides teaches four geostatistics courses in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara, including a seminar in geostatistics (graduate level), introduction to spatial data analysis (graduate level), advanced spatial data analysis (graduate level), and an introduction to geographical data analysis (undergraduate level). Dr. Kyriakidis has given various invited presentations in the U.S. and abroad. He was a keynote speaker in the International Statistical Institute (ISI) “Cutting Edge Conference on Spatial Statistics for Production Ecology, GIS, and Remote Sensing”, held in April 1999 in Wageningen, The Netherlands. He was recently (July 2003) invited as a guest lecturer for three presentations (Principles of spatial stochastic simulation, Geostatistical space-time models, and Geostatistical integration of spatial data), and associated computer laboratories, during the summer course “Spatio-Temporal Statistical Analysis of Multi-Platform Optical Ocean Color Observations”, sponsored by the National Science Foundation’s initiative “Collaborations in Mathematical Geosciences”, and held at the Darling Marine Center at the University of Maine. In addition, Dr. Kyriakidis serves as an alternate delegate representing the Dept. of Geography of UCSB at the University Consortium of Geographic Information Science (UCGIS), the premier academic organization in the U.S. for the advancement of GIScience. Dr. Kyriakides has peer-reviewed papers for numerous journals within the fields of geology and geosciences, remote sensing, environmental science, and geographic information science. Five publications closely related to this research project include:

- P.C. Kyriakidis, and E.-H. Yoo (2004): Geostatistical prediction and simulation of point values from areal data, Geographical Analysis (in press)
- P.C. Kyriakidis (2004): A geostatistical framework for area-to-point spatial interpolation, Geographical Analysis, 36(3), 259-289
- P.C. Kyriakidis, J. Kim, and N. L. Miller (2001): Geostatistical mapping of precipitation from rain gauge data using atmospheric and terrain characteristics, Journal of Applied Meteorology, 40(11), 1855-1877
- P.C. Kyriakidis (2001): Geostatistical models of uncertainty for spatial data, in: Spatial Uncertainty in Ecology: Implications for Remote Sensing and GIS Applications, C.T., Hunsaker, M.F., Goodchild, M.A., Friedl, and T.J., Case, Eds. Springer-Verlag, NY, p.175-213
- P.C. Kyriakidis, and J.D. Dungan (2001): A geostatistical approach for mapping thematic classification accuracy and evaluating the impact of inaccurate spatial data on ecological model predictions, Journal of Environmental and Ecological Statistics, 8(4), 311-330

 

Matt Rice

Graduate Researcher
Department of Geography
University of California Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060

Email: rice@geog.ucsb.edu
Web: http://www.geog.ucsb.edu/~rice

Matt is a doctoral student in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Matt holds undergraduate degrees in Music (BA), Statistical Science (BS), and Geography (BS) from Brigham Young University (1995), and a Master of Science degree in Geography from Brigham Young University (1998). Matt’s current research interests include geographic data sharing and intellectual property control, multimedia cartography, and distributed geographic information systems and spatial webs.

 

Jordan Hastings

Graduate Researcher
Department of Geography
University of California Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060

Email: jordan@geog.ucsb.edu
Web: http://www.geog.ucsb.edu/~jordan

Jordan Hastings is a doctoral student in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Jordan has a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics from the University of San Francisco, a Master of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and a Master of Science degree in Geography from the University of Nevada, Reno. Jordan’s current research interests include geologic mapping and geologic map databases, gazetteer development, and geocomputation.

 

Philipp Schneider

Graduate Researcher
Department of Geography
University of California Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060

Email: phil@geog.ucsb.edu
Web: http://www.geog.ucsb.edu/~phil

Philipp Schneider is a doctoral student in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He holds Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Geography from the University of Munich (2000, 2003). Philipp’s current research interests include geographic data accuracy assessment, and integrative, dynamic models for wildfire prediction.

 

Qingfeng Guan

Graduate Researcher
Department of Geography
University of California Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060

Email: guan@geog.ucsb.edu
Web: http://www.geog.ucsb.edu/~guan

Qingfeng Guan is a doctoral student in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Geography from the East China Normal Universtiy, Shanghai (2000), and a Master of Science degree from the Institute of Geographical Science and Natural Resource Research, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (2003). Qingfeng’s current research interests include artificial neural-network-based constrained cellular automata models for urban growth simulation, grid computing for urban growth cellular automata, and geocomputation.